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Investing in an active Queensland

TMR recognises and embraces that the department’s diverse forms of network services contribute to the quality of life of Queenslanders. Promoting and investing in active transport solutions—bike riding or walking—help support broader community benefits and improve accessibility to the transport network.

Active Transport Investment Program

Principal Cycle Network Plans and Priority Route Maps provide a blueprint for a connected network of core cycling routes across Queensland. The maps show more than 10,400 kilometres of Principal Cycle Network (PCN) and cover 53 local government areas.

TMR’s Active Transport Investment Program (ATIP) has been in place since 2006 and is a major funding initiative to accelerate delivery of the PCN and encourage people to ride bikes more often. The program promotes and supports collaboration between state and local governments to achieve a ‘one network’ outcome for bike riding.

Investment is prioritised to provide bikeways that are physically separated from other traffic to make riding safer and support new riders. More people riding benefits everyone through better health, a better transport system and better communities.

On average, every $1 invested in bike riding returns about $5 in economic benefits to Queensland through better health outcomes and congestion reduction.

Over $67 million in funding was committed through the ATIP for cycling infrastructure, planning and programs, and into walking initiatives across Queensland in 2018–19.

Cycling Works

This program provides on-going capital funding for the development of cycling infrastructure on the state-controlled PCN with projects being delivered by TMR. This program has funded 39 major state bike riding facilities since 2006, delivering over 56 kilometres of network for over $120 million in investment.

An example of some of the projects that either started construction or were delivered by TMR in 2018–19 under the Cycling Works program are:

  • North Brisbane Bikeway Stages 2 and 3, north of Brisbane that started construction in May 2019
  • Stage E of the Veloway 1 south of Brisbane started construction late 2018
  • Mission Beach Cycleway in Cairns completed in June 2019
  • Veloway 1 Cycleway (Logan Road – Paradise Road), Springwood completed in March 2019
  • David Low Way (Warran Road to Andrew Street) in the Sunshine Coast completed in November 2018
  • Ferry Street cycle crossing in Maryborough finished in November 2018.

Cycling Grants

This program provides on-going capital grant funding to local governments for the development of bike riding infrastructure on the local PCN. Funding is provided on a dollar for dollar matched basis (50 per cent) with local government responsible for delivery and ownership of the facilities.

This program has funded 454 projects since 2006, delivering around 444 kilometres of network through a commitment of $139 million in Queensland Government funding.

An example of some of the projects with funding in 2018–19 included:

  • $1.7 million in funding to Livingstone Shire Council towards the design and construction of Kemp Beach, Rosslyn, Mulambin Road - Wildin Way, shared path currently under construction
  • $1.5 million in funding to Moreton Bay Regional Council towards the design and construction of the Caboolture - Wamuran Rail Trail, Beerburrum Road - King Street, (Stage 1) completed in May 2019
  • $693,361 in funding to Torres Shire Council towards the design and construction of Thursday Island shared path stage 3 construction currently in detailed design (construction forecast for 2019–20)
  • $533,657 in funding to Central Highlands Regional Council towards the design and construction of Clermont Street, Emerald, to Racecourse Road, shared path currently under construction
  • $245,000 in funding to Somerset Regional Council towards the design and construction of Esk-Hampton Road, Esk, Pineliner Park - Redbank Creek, shared path completed in January 2019
  • $211,950 in funding to Burdekin Shire Council towards the design and construction International Park, Ayr, Beach Road - Clayton Street, shared path that is currently under construction
  • $160,000 in funding to Gladstone Region Council towards the design and construction of the Tannum Sands Road shared path currently under construction
  • $152,500 in funding to Weipa Town Authority towards the design and construction of Central Avenue, Weipa, Duyfken Crescent - Boundary Road, shared path completed June 2019.

Cycling Operations

This program provides on-going operations funding to delivery actions in the Queensland Cycling Action Plan under the Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017–2027 and includes an allocation to deliver and support walking initiatives, including the Queensland Walking Strategy.

Cycling Maintenance

This program provides on-going capital funding in the maintenance and rehabilitation of off-road cycleways on the state-controlled transport network including:

  • Veloway 1
  • Centenary Cycleway
  • Ipswich Motorway Shared Path.

Active Transport Rail Trails

This program provides funding to 2020–21 to support local governments to develop trails for bike riding, walking and horse riding on disused rail corridors. The 2018–19 program involved funding feasibility studies for the following:

  • $99,000 to Gladstone and North Burnett Regional Councils for Reid Creek to Taragoola (Taragoola, Monto and Gayndah) rail trail completed in 2018–19
  • $92,000 to Bundaberg Regional Council for Bundaberg to Gin Gin rail trail completed in 2018–19
  • $225,354 to Livingston Shire Council for the Pineapple (Yeppoon to Mount Chalmers) rail trail due for completion late July 2019
  • $97,688 to Mareeba Shire Council for the Mareeba to Walkamin rail trail due for completion late September 2019
  • $66,000 to Fraser Coast Regional council for the Mary to the Bay (Urraween to Colton) rail trail due for completion late July 2019.

Completion of the feasibility studies will allow local governments to determine whether facilities could be constructed, and it is anticipated that this will generate further applications for funding from the program to support delivery.

More than 802,0001 Queenslanders ride a bike each week and 1.53 million would ride if the conditions were right2.
  • 1 Austroads, 2017
  • 2 The University of Sydney, 2015

Case study

Active transport infrastructure benefit studies

Investment in active transport infrastructure returns on average $5 to Queensland in health benefits, reduced traffic congestion and other benefits for every dollar spent3. To gain more detailed insights into the benefits of active transport infrastructure at a local level, the department commissioned evaluations on projects delivered across the state.

To share the findings, the department published 18 cost benefit analysis and evaluation reports covering projects like the Eudlo Creek cycle and pedestrian bridge and the Mooloolaba to Minyama bikeway on the Sunshine Coast, Brisbane’s Veloway 1 (Stage D) and Moggill Road cycle bridge, as well as the award-winning Brinsmead- Redlynch Connector Path in Cairns.

The reports will be useful for practitioners involved in the design and assessment of active transport infrastructure, as well as our key bike riding stakeholders. They also demonstrate how the department is delivering customer-centric solutions in partnership with our stakeholders across state and local jurisdictions, embracing critical and creative thinking and investing in the transport network for the future.

The technical information found in the evaluation reports has been used to develop case studies that showcase innovative and fit-for- purpose projects funded by the department.

  • 3 Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Queensland Cycle Infrastructure Investment Strategy 2016-26 and Business Case. Brisbane. Unpublished report.
A customer service officer conducting customer assistance duties on the tram network (Photo credit: Keolis Downer).

Moggill Road Cycle Bridge adjacent to the Western Freeway in Indooroopilly, Brisbane.

For more information: Cycling

Wayfinding signage

TMR is making it easier for people to find their way while riding on our extensive and growing cycle networks.

More than 120 new wayfinding signs have been installed on the Veloway 1 (V1) Cycleway from Eight Mile Plains to Brisbane City, helping riders to make full use of this world class facility. A further 100 new wayfinding signs have been installed on the Centenary Cycleway covering more than 16 kilometres from Carole Park to Toowong.

Investment in these new high-quality signs is part of TMR’s $6.91 million commitment towards rehabilitation of state-controlled off-road cycleways between 2017–18 and 2020–21.

To understand the impacts of improvement works like the installation of new signage, the department has installed permanent bicycle counters to monitor use on these cycleways.

Making sure signage on Queensland cycle networks is up to date and consistent is a priority of the Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017–2027 and will help get more people riding more often.

TMR has recently published new guidance that supports best practice design and installation of wayfinding signage, helping local governments and TMR districts to make it easier for people to plan their journey and navigate bicycle networks across the state.

Local governments can also apply for state matched funding to deliver signage and wayfinding upgrades on the Principal Cycle Network through TMR’s Cycle Network Local Government Grants Program.

For more information: Cycling

Wayfinding cyclist signs, displaying the direction and distance to suburbs

Newly installed wayfinding signage on the Centenary Cycleway.

Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017–27 and Queensland Cycling Action Plan 2017–19

In August 2017, the Queensland Government launched the Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017–2027 with a vision for more cycling, more often across Queensland.

The strategy was accompanied by a two-year Queensland Cycling Action Plan 2017–2019 which outlined 63 practical and targeted actions to make bicycle riding safer and more convenient for everyone.

Through the strategy and action plan, the department has demonstrated continued commitment and investment into active transport.

Over $67 million was committed to cycling infrastructure, planning and programs, and walking initiatives across Queensland during 2018–19, including:

  • $18.7 million in grant funding committed to local governments this year, with over 20 projects in regional Queensland
  • $37.2 million committed to the construction of major facilities such as the North Brisbane Bikeway and Bruce Highway facilities
  • $45 million for Stage E of Veloway 1 to complete a significant missing link on this important high-volume cycleway
  • $14 million over four years to support local governments develop rail trails and spur regional economic development
  • $2.5 million to deliver Queensland’s first statewide walking strategy.

Principal Cycle Network Plans

The Principal Cycle Network Plans (PCNPs) and accompanying Priority Route Maps provide a blueprint for a connected network of core routes across the state. There are now more than 10,400 kilometres of principal cycle network identified throughout Queensland covering more than 99 per cent of the state’s population.

Councils with an approved PCNP are eligible to apply for 50:50 funding under the Cycle Network Local Government Grants (CNLGG) Program. The CNLGG program has funded 454 projects since 2006, delivering around 444 kilometres of network through a commitment of $139 million in Queensland Government funding.

In 2018, the Central Queensland PCNP was expanded to include five additional councils—Barcaldine, Longreach, Winton, Blackall-Tambo and Boulia. These councils can now apply for grants to help fund bicycle infrastructure projects on their highest priority routes.

In 2018–19, the department invested over $18 million in 49 new local government grant projects that will deliver over 33 kilometres of bike riding facilities when complete, including 20 projects in regional Queensland. Some of the projects included in the 2018–19 CNLGG program are:

  • Caboolture - Wamuran Rail Trail, Beerburrum Road - King Street, (Stage 1)
  • International Park, Ayr, Beach Road - Clayton Street, shared path
  • Esk-Hampton Road, Esk, Pineliner Park - Redbank Creek, shared path
  • Clermont Street, Emerald, to Racecourse Road, shared path
  • Kemp Beach, Rosslyn, Mulambin Road - Wildin Way, shared path
  • Thursday Island shared path stage 3 design and construction
  • Central Avenue, Weipa, Duyfken Crescent - Boundary Road, shared path
  • Tannum Sands Road Shared Path, design and construction.
Riding a bike is one of life’s great pleasures. As TMR’s Cycling Champion, I am committed to making sure that we do everything we can to make the transport system bike-friendly so that riding is easy, safe and fun for everyone.
Matt Longland, Cycling Champion

Rail trails: Caboolture to Wamuran

Rail trails are an example of the department working with local governments to repurpose some of Queensland’s network of disused rail corridors to allow local communities and visitors to use them for walking, bike riding and horse riding.

While retaining the corridors for potential future transport use, rail trails support active, healthy lifestyles, capitalise on our great weather and stunning destinations, and contribute to environmental preservation and management. Encouraging locals and visitors to use the rail trails also contributes to the growth and creation of small businesses in the hospitality and tourism sectors.

To do this, TMR’s Rail Trail Local Government Grants Program is investing up to $14 million over four years in grants to support local governments to plan, design and construct rail trails. The program is a collaborative effort between the Active Transport Investment Program which manages the funding, and Rail Corridor Management which is establishing sub-leasing arrangements and coordinating maintenance arrangements with local government.

This grants program builds on the success of trails already in operation such as the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail and the Caboolture to Wamuran Rail Trail funded through the Cycle Network Local Government Grants program. The Caboolture to Wamuran Rail Trail is being delivered in three stages with stage one of construction now complete and stage two underway.

For more information: Rail trails

Queensland Walking Strategy

The Queensland Walking Strategy will provide the framework for promoting walking as an accessible, active transport mode across the state, delivering the health benefits for Queenslanders and access to important destinations such as schools, shops and public transport.

The department is developing the Queensland Walking Strategy in consultation with community members and stakeholders. A two-month engagement period closed 3 February 2019 and a Walking Summit was held 14 March 2019.

This engagement has helped set the direction, policies and priorities the department will focus on to get more people walking, more often, for more reasons.

The strategy is due for release late 2019 and it will include:

  • 10-year strategy document
  • 2-year action plan
  • Walking in Queensland report.

The Queensland Walking Strategy will guide the investment of $2.5 million over three years to deliver a range of walking initiatives.

For more information: Queensland Walking Strategy

A OneTMR approach to deliver a world-class Tour de Brisbane

On Sunday 14 April 2019, Brisbane hosted the inaugural Tour de Brisbane event as part of the Brisbane Cycling Festival.

More than 4000 competitive and non-competitive cycling participants rode through the heart of Brisbane on a course that involved closures of multiple major roads, including the Legacy Way Tunnel, the historical Story Bridge, and Brisbane’s South East Busway.

Ensuring the success of the event was a OneTMR effort, with six months of planning between TMR’s roads and public transport teams, Brisbane City Council, and the event organisers to identify a suitable, world-calibre course design that minimised impact for affected road users and public transport passengers.

Rolling road closures and public transport diversions for the event were in place between 4am – 2pm. To ensure the smooth running of the event on the day, the department participated in a multi-agency situation room with the event managers and Brisbane City Council to monitor and manage road and public transport impacts. To ensure public transport customers were well supported through the changes, departmental staff were stationed across the bus network to provide information on alternative transport options.

The event has been recognised as an outstanding success, thanks to the co-operation and efforts in pre-event planning and on-the-day operational management.

Cyclists riding on the busway

Tour de Brisbane event at Eight Mile Plains Busway station.